1. Touch the Callanish Standing Stones
  2. Drive through Golden Road
  3. Have a picnic on Luskentyre Beach
  4. Visit Shawbost Mill
  5. Take a cruise to St Kilda
  6. Take a boat to the ‘Castle in the Sea’
  7. Have a walk to the Butt of Lewis Lighthouse
  8. Cycling on Benbecula Grimsay

Known as the Western Isles Innse Gall or "islands of the strangers" in English, Outer Hebrides are the special and amazing place!
The Scottish Western Isles of the Outer Hebrides are a diverse chain of inter-connected islands situated on Europe's Atlantic edge. Although hard to get to it is worth the struggle here’s why.

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Touch the Callanish Standing Stones

Many people agree that walking inside a standing stone circle can be a magical and mysterious experience. That's something you definitely need to sample at the stones of Callanish!
The village of Callanish stands on the "west side" of the Isle of Lewis, on the Atlantic coast. The Stones are formed in a central circle and avenues leading away from this central hub.
It is thought that the first stones were erected around 4500 years ago, it's older than Stonehenge! But what it was used for and who built it is not known, which only adds to the eerie atmosphere of the place.
There is a visitor centre by the site which tells the story of the Standing Stones - it is known who, why and when built it!

Callanish Stone Circle
Callanish Stone Circle by Andrew Bennett (CC BY 2.0)

Drive through Golden Road

Driving on the Golden Road is surely an extraordinary experience. It is a single track road which leads to the south end of the Isle of Harris and is surrounded by spectacular “lunar” landscapes along the way.
It probably is called 'golden' because of the amount of money spent on establishing the road.

Cluer, Bays of Harris - 2
Cluer, Bays of Harris - 2 by Colin Campbell (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Have a picnic on Luskentyre Beach

This may well be the most scenic Scottish beach. Sometimes simply called heaven on earth it resembles closely beaches in the Caribbean with it’s blue and green water and white sands.
It is one of those places that you simply need to visit, go on put it down on you bucket list.

Cluer, Bays of Harris - 2
Luskentyre Bay by Stuart Beattie (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Visit Shawbost Mill

Isle of Lewis was once home to around 200 buildings like this one. The charming Mill and Kiln were reconstructed in 1993 and are settling beautifully into the Outer Hebrides horizon. Maybe it’s not the most spectacular of the Island attractions but definitely worth a visit.

Norse Mill and Kiln, Shawbost
Norse Mill and Kiln, Shawbost by Haydn Blackey (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Take a cruise to St Kilda

St. Kilda was evacuated in 1930, and the islands are now a National Reserve and the UK's only dual UNESCO World Heritage Site.
The natural beauty of the archipelago comes from the remnants of a volcano.
Named “the islands at the edge of the world” they stir imagination from the first moment you look at them. It's a retreat for ornithologists and birdwatchers alike; puffins, fulmars and guillemots can all be found here.

Boreray
Boreray by Neil Wilkie (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Take a boat to the ‘Castle in the Sea’

Kisimul Castle is the only important medieval castle to still stand proudly in all of the Western Isles it is also The seat of the chief of Clan MacNeil. It gets its name from the Gaelic cìosamul meaning "castle island".
The castle can be reached by taking a five-minute boat trip from Castle Bay.

kisimul castle evening
kisimul castle evening by damian entwistle (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Feel the spirit of Gearrannan Blackhouse Village

Gearrannan Blackhouse Village situated on the Atlantic coast gives you an authentic glimpse into its rich past.
This amazing crofting village offers accommodation, historical activities as well as walking, cycling and fishing spots. The buildings are restored using traditional methods giving this place a unique charm.

Blackhouse Village
Blackhouse Village by Reading Tom (CC BY 2.0)

Have a walk to the Butt of Lewis Lighthouse

This lighthouse is pretty much as far north as you can go on the Outer Hebrides.
Build in 1860s this lighthouse was erected to aid ships through the jagged rocks which are some of the oldest rocks in Europe, this place was also claimed to be the most windiest spot in the United Kingdom.
Let that not discourage you as this place looks amazing.

Lewis Lighthouse
Lewis Lighthouse by George Monk (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Climb the Heaval

At 1257 feet Heaval is the highest hill on Barra. The walk can be a bit steep but extremely rewarding in views. On the top of the hill there a statue of the Madonna and Child, known locally as Our Lady of the Sea.

Heaval, Barraby
Heaval, Barraby aaronsimonsen (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Cycling on Benbecula Grimsay

Great opportunity to explore the best landscapes of Outer Hebrides is to jump on a bike and follow some extent of Hebridean Way Cycling Route.
This route goes through the stunning and very flat west coast of Benbecula, along the main administrative centre of Balivanich and after that crosses the causeway to Grimsay.

Cycling on Benbecula
Cycling on Benbecula by Robbie Shade (CC BY 2.0)

 

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